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Lost Boats

Lost Boats by Month
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Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Sources

JANUARY

  
USS S-36 (SS-141) was lost on 20-Jan-1942 when it was destroyed after grounding on Taka Bakang Reef in Makassar Strait, Indonesia, Near Makassar City.  The crew were all rescued.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM
Remarks:  No known reports of wreckage being salvaged or sighted.

She was on her second war patrol under the command of LT J.R. McKnight, Jr. 100 miles after last having been able to fix her position, she ran hard aground.  Unable to get free, she radiod for help.  The entire crew was eventually transferred to a Dutch ship, which took them to Makassar city.  Before abandoning her, S-36 was flooded and destroyed.

  
USS S-26 (SS-131) was lost on 24-Jan-1942 with the loss of 46 crew when it was sunk after ramming by USS PC-460 in the Gulf of Panama, 14 miles west of San Jose Light.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Ship reported dived shortly before sinking.  In diveable water off Panamanian coast.

Under the command of LCDR E.C. Hawk, S-26 was starting on her second war patrol.  Proceeding to station, she was rammed in the dark by the USS PC-460 on the starboard side of the torpedo room, sinking within a few seconds.  The CO, XO and one lookout, who had been on the bridge, were the only survivors.

  
USS Argonaut (SS-166) was lost on 10-Jan-1943 with the loss of 102 crew when it was sunk off Rabaul in the Java Sea near 05° 155N; 153° 50E; (Another location given as 5° 40S; 152° 02E)
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Water over 1000'.

Argonaut was under the command of LCDR J.R. Pierce, and on her third war patrol.  Attacking a convoy, she apparently hit an escorting destroyer.  Two other destroyers conducted a depth charge attack on Argonaut, which attempted to surface.   With only her bow showing at a steep angle, the destroyers continued shelling her until she slipped from view for the last time.  The details above were from a US Army plane that witnessed the attack but was returning to base with an empty bomb rack and unable to assist.

  
USS Scorpion (SS-278) was lost on 5-Jan-1944 with the loss of 77 crew when it was sunk in the Yellow Sea off China.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  WDR date spread is 1-5-44 to 2-24-44

She was on her fourth war patrol under the command of CDR M.G. Schmidt.  There are no clues to her exact fate, but it is assumed she was lost to one of the many mines laid in the area by the enemy.

  
USS Swordfish (SS-193) was lost on or after 12-Jan-1945 with the loss of 89 crew when it was sunk near Yaku Island off Okinawa.  Water <700' deep near island; ( 27° 00 N; 128° 40 E).
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Loss declared 15 Feb 45.  Some use this date.

On her thirteenth war patrol, she was commanded by CDR K.E. Montross and was tasked with photo reconnaissance in preparation for the anticipated invasion of Okinawa.  The exact cause of her loss has never been determined, but she was probably lost to a mine.

FEBRUARY

  
USS Shark (SS-174) was lost on 11-Feb-1942 with the loss of 59 crew when it was sunk East of Menado, Celebes Island.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Loss most likely was the result of one of 3 attacks.11 Feb 42 East of Menado, 17 Feb 42 North of Kendari 21 Feb 42 East of Kendari (Ros).

Shark was on her first war patrol under the command of LCDR L. Shane, Jr.  Post-war examination of Japanese records showed that there were three separate antisubmarine attacks in this general period and area that might have caused the loss of Shark, but the most likely was a depth-charging that took place on the 11th.  If correct, this makes Shark the first U.S. submarine to be sunk by enemy surface craft in the Pacific.

  
USS Amberjack (SS-219) was lost on 16-Feb-1943 with the loss of 72 crew when it was sunk off Rabaul in the Soloman Sea.   Last Contact at 5° 05S; 152° 37E
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM
Remarks:  She was on her third war patrol and commanded by LCDR J.A. Bole.  Amberjack appears to have been the US submarine attacked by a Japanese patrol plane on that date, followed up by a depth charge attack by a torpedo boat and subchaser which resulted in a large amount of oil and wreckage coming to the surface.

  
USS Grayback (SS-208) was lost on 26-Feb-1944 with the loss of 80 crew when it was sunk near 25° 47N 128° 45E off Okinawa.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Japanese records indicate 26 Feb, US records state 27 Feb.  Dateline difference.

Commanded by CDR J.A. Moore, Grayback was on her tenth war patrol.  During this patrol, she had sunk 4 ships totaling 21,594 tons.  Overall, Grayback was tied for eleventh in the number of enemy ships sunk during the war.  She appears to have been caught on the surface by a Japanese carrier plane whose bombs made a direct hit.  She was reported to have exploded and sunk immediately.  Surface antisubmarine craft followed up with a depth charge attack where air bubbles rose, finally followed by the appearance of a large oil slick.

  
USS Trout (SS-202) was lost on or after 29-Feb-1944 with the loss of 81 crew when it was sunk near 22° 40N; 131° 45 E, middle of the Phillipine Sea.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  On her eleventh war patrol, she was commanded by LCDR A.H. Clark.  Winner of three Presidential Unit Citations, Trout had carried out several notable special missions earlier, including carrying over two tons of gold bullion out of Corregidor in February 1942.  She was sunk by escorts after sinking a passenger-cargoman and damaging another in a convoy.

  
USS Barbel (SS-316) was lost on or after 4-Feb-1945 with the loss of 81 crew when it was sunk in southern entrance to Palawan Passage 7° 49.5N; 116° 47.5E Palawan.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Loss date could be as late as 6 February, however Japanese records indicate the 4th as the sinking attack date.

Commanded by LCDR C.L. Raguet, she was on her third war patrol.  On 3 February, Barbel reported three unsuccessful depth charge attacks by Japanese aircraft.  Based on Japanese records, the following day a submarine was bombed in the same area: one direct hit near the bridge caused it to sink immediately "under a cloud of fire and spray".  This was almost certainly how Barbel met her end.

MARCH

  
USS F-4 [ex-SKATE] (SS23) was lost on 21-Mar-1915 with the loss of 21 crew when it foundered off Honolulu Harbor.
Sources:  R, D, SFLM
Remarks:  Hulk raised and reburied off Serria 13 north of Submarine Base, Pearl Harbor.

     
USS H-1 (SS-28) was lost on 12-Mar-1920 with the loss of 4 crew when it Grounded, Magdalena Bay, Mexico.  Was sunk in 9 Fathoms while being towed off.
Sources:  R, D, SFLM
Remarks:  Hull reported located in 1995.  Return expeditions have not relocated hull.  Likely to be buried in sand and uncovered only periodically.

  
USS Perch (SS-176) was scuttled on 3-Mar-1942 30 Miles NW Soerabia, Java.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  All crew survived sinking and were rescued by Japanese forces.  Reportely the wreck has been located and dived.  No written report seen.

Under the command of LCDR D.A. Hurt, she was on her 1st war patrol.  After two severe depth chargings in less than 200 feet of water, Perch was so badly damaged throughout that she could barely stay on the surface, could not make more than 5 knots, and had no remaining means of defending herself.  As three Japanese Destroyers closed in, LCDR Hurt ordered the crew to abandon ship and Perch was scuttled.  Of the 59 officers and men taken prisoner, 53 survived the war.

  
USS Grampus (SS-207) was lost on or after 5-Mar-1943 with the loss of 71 crew when it was sunk in the Blackett Strait; Possibly in Vella Gulf.  Last contacts at 4° 55S; 152° 30 E
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Under the command of LCDR J.R. Craig, Grampus was on her 6th war patrol.  She was lost probably as a result of engaging two Japanese Destroyers that had just passed through the nearby Blackett Strait.

  
USS Triton (SS-201) was lost on 15-Mar-1943 with the loss of 74 crew when it was sunk at 0° 09N; 144° 55E during a Japanese surface attack.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Triton had first contacted the enemy in December 1941 off Wake Island.  Among her 11 victims were the Japanese submarine I-164 and one Destroyer.  At the time of her loss, she was commanded by LCDR G.K. MacKenzie, Jr.   She was sunk just north of the Admiralty Islands during a fight with three Japanese Destroyers.

  
USS Tullibee (SS-284) was lost on 26-Mar-1944 with the loss of 79 crew when it was sunk in operating area just north of Palau.  One man was taken prisoner and he survived the war.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  She was under the command of CDR C.F. Brindupke, and on her 4th war patrol.  Making a night surface attack in poor visibility, Tullibee fired two bow tube torpedoes at a convoy.  About a minute and a half later, a stunning explosion rocked her, knocking the sole survivor (a lookout) into the water.  Tullibee was never heard from again.  The lookout was picked up the next morning and survived the war as a Japanese prisoner.  It is believed that Tullibee was a victim of a circular run by one of her own torpedoes.

  
USS Kete (SS-369) was lost sometime on or after 20-Mar-1945 with the loss of 87 crew when it was sunk somewhere between 29° 38N; 130° 02E and Midway.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  R states probably sunk off Nansei Shoto on or about 20 Mar 1945.  WDR gives date spread of 3-20-45 to 3-31-45

Under command of LCDR Edward Ackermann, Kete was just finishing her 2nd war patrol.  On 20 March, she had acknowledged orders to return to Midway by 31 March, and was never heard from again.  She was probably sunk somewhere near Okinawa, possibly by a Japanese submarine that itself was subsequently lost.

  
USS Trigger (SS-237) was lost on 28-Mar-1945 with the loss of 89 crew when it was sunk in area 32° 16N 30° 40N by 132° 05E-127° 50E in the East China Sea.  (Maybe near 32° 16N; 132° 05E).
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Trigger had an illustrious career, winning 2 Presidential Unit Citations and 1 Navy Unit Citations.  She ranks 7th in total Japanese tonnage sunk and is tied for 8th in the number of ships sunk.  At the time of her loss, Trigger was under the command of CDR D.R. Connole, and was on her 12th war patrol.  She was in the area of Okinawa, involved in operations leading up to the invasion.  She was lost during a combined attack by Japanese antisubmarine vessels and aircraft.

APRIL

  
USS Pickerel (SS-177) was lost on 3-Apr-1943 with the loss of 74 crew when it was sunk within lume of Shiramuka Light off Honshu, Japan.  (AKA Shiranuka Light)
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Ros discusses date discrepancy.

The exact cause of her loss has never been determined, although her area of operation close to the Japanese homeland contained numerous minefields.

  
USS Grenadier (SS-210) was scuttled 22-Apr-1943 after serious damage by aircraft near Penang.  About 10 Miles West of Lem Voalan Strait in the Indian Ocean.  76 crew were taken prisoner.  72 survived the war.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  No losses in the scuttling operation.  All crew rescued by Japanese forces.

Under the command of LCDR J.A. Fitzgerald, she was on her 6th war patrol.  Caught while stalking a convoy, she was spotted by a plane and dove.  While passing 130 feet, a bomb dropped by the plane exploded, severely damaging Grenadier.   She eventually lodged in the bottom mud at 270 feet and the crew spent hours fighting very serious fires and flooding throughout the boat.  When she was able to regain the surface, she had no remaining propulsion, and was soon attacked by another enemy plane.  While she successfully fought off the plane, mortally wounding the pilot, the arrival of additional enemy surface craft led LCDR Fitzgerald to the decision to abandon ship and sink the boat.  Of the 61 officers and men taken prisoner, 57 survived the war.

  
USS Snook (SS-279) was lost sometime after 8-Apr-1945 with the loss of 84 crew when it was sunk within 100 miles East of 18° 40N; 111° 39E, near Hainan Island
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  R states missing after 8 April.  Ros states could have been later up to late May.  WDR gives date spread of 4-8-45 to 4-20-45

Snook ranks 10th in total Japanese tonnage sunk and is tied for 9th in the number of ships sunk.  At the time of her loss, she was commanded by CDR J.F. Walling.  She was lost in the vicinity of Hainan Island, possibly falling victim to a Japanese submarine.

  
USS Thresher (SSN-593) was lost on 10-Apr-1963 with the loss of 129 crew and yard workers from Portsmouth Naval Shipyard when it sunk while on sea trials near Isle of Shoals.
Sources:  Personal
Remarks:  On line handling party when boat left Portsmouth.  Dived regularly for survey.

At the time of her loss, she was commanded by CDR Wes Harvey.  Thresher was the first of a new class that significantly advanced the technological level of nuclear attack submarines.  She had just completed an overhaul and was lost in a dive at test depth in over 8000 feet of water, the first nuclear submarine ever to be lost.  In the wake of this disaster, many lessons were learned that resulted in the SubSafe Program, involving the redesign of ship systems and procedures, as well as rigorous periodic inspections of welds in submarines.

MAY

  
USS Squalus (SS-192) was lost on 23-May-1939 with a loss of 26 crew.  33 rescued when it flooded and sank off Portsmouth, NH.
Sources:  R, D,SFLM
Remarks:  She flooded via the main induction piping. Despite the loss, a substantial portion of her crew was rescued.   Squalus herself was raised, overhauled and refitted, then re-commissioned as Sailfish.  Under that name, she won one Presidential Unit Citation during World War II, and sank 45,000 tons of enemy shipping, including an escort carrier.

  
USS Gudgeon (SS-211) was lost on 12 May 1944 with the loss of 79 officers and men when it was sunk off Saipan near Maug Island in the northern Mariajas.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Loss declared after 14 May 44.  Ostlund says his research shows loss northeast of Iwo Jima.  On 18 April.  WDR date spread 4-7-44 to 5-12-44

Winner of 5 Presidential Unit Citations, Gudgeon was on her twelfth war patrol.  Commanded by LCDR R.A. Bonin, Gudgeon was lost most likely to a combined air and surface antisubmarine attack.  Gudgeon had been the first US submarine to go on patrol from Hawaii following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and headed directly into Japanese home waters.  On that first patrol, she had become the first US submarine to sink an enemy warship, picking off the submarine I-173.

  
USS Lagarto (SS-371) was lost on or shortly after 3-May-1945 with the loss of 86 crew when it was sunk in off Malay Coast in or near the Gulf of Siam 7° 55N; 102° 00E.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Diveable water of less than 200 feet.  The Lagarto has been located and the US Navy is aware of her location and the condition of the hull.

On her second war patrol, commanded by CDR F.D. Latta, she was teaming with the Baya in tracking a convoy.  Lagarto is believed to have been lost to a radar-equipped minelayer, the Hatsutaka.  Even though forced down in shallow (30 fathom) water offering limited chances for evasion, CDR Latta was an experienced captain.  She must have been lost to a lucky direct hit.  In a simple form of justice, Hatsutaka was sunk by Hawkbill less than 2 weeks later.

  
USS Stickleback (SS-415) was lost on 28-May-1958 when it sank off Hawaii while being towed, after collision with USS Silverstein (DE-534).
Sources:  R, D, SFLM
Remarks:  All the crew were taken off prior to sinking.

  
USS Scorpion (SSN-589) was lost on 22-May-1968 with the loss of 99 crew when it was sunk while in transit from Med, 400 miles southwest of the Azores.
Sources:  R, SFLM
Remarks:  Regularly dived for survey HMC Saville from Seadragon was Doc on Scorpion.

She was transiting from the Mediterranean Sea to Norfolk, and was commanded by CDR F.H. Slattery.  It took 5 months to locate Scorpion, 400 miles southwest of the Azore Islands at a depth of 10,000 feet.  No official cause of this loss was ever determined, and remains a controversy to this day.  Scorpion was the second nuclear-powered US submarine lost, and - hopefully - the last.

JUNE

  
USS O-9 (SS-70) was lost on 20-Jun-1941 with the loss of 33 crew when it foundered off Isle of Shoals, 15 miles from Portsmouth NH, 42° 59' 48N - 20° 20' 27W
Sources:  R, D, SFLM
Remarks:  Depth 400 feet.  Reported dived 2001.  Visibility nil, side scan sonar images only.

At the time of her loss, O-9 was undergoing a deep test dive.

  
USS S-27 (SS-132) was lost on 19-Jun-1942 when it grounded off Amchitka Island, 400 yds off island Near St Makarius Point (near Constantine Harbor).  All the crew were rescued.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM
Remarks:  Diveable water

She grounded off Amchitka Island, only 60 miles from Kiska, then held by the Japanese.  S-27, equipped with neither radar nor a fathometer, was on the surface in poor visibility charging batteries and drifted onto the shoals.  When it became apparent that she could not be freed and started to take a dangerous list, the captain, LCDR H.L. Jukes, got the entire crew to shore (400 yards away) in relays using a 3-man rubber raft.  The entire crew was subsequently rescued.

  
USS R-12 (SS-89) was lost on 12-Jun-1943 with the loss of 42 crew when it foundered off Key West, 24° 24' 30N - 81° 28' 30"W
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Reportedly dived.  No published report seen yet.

Commanded by LCDR E.E. Shelby, R-12 had two Brazilian Naval Officers aboard, and was taking position for a practice torpedo approach, rigged for dive but on the surface "riding the vents". The captain was on the bridge with 2 other officers and 3 men.  The collision alarm was sounded and the word passed that there was flooding in the forward battery compartment.   Shelby ordered main ballast blown and all hatches closed, but as he ordered it, R-12 disappeared beneath him in 600 feet of water.  All those on the bridge survived.  A Court of Inquiry did not establish a definite cause of the loss, but thought that flooding through a torpedo tube was the most likely one.  In the face of this loss, one consolation was that an additional 18 of the normal crew was on liberty at the time of the accident.

  
USS Herring (SS-233) was lost on 1-Jun-1944 with the loss of 83 crew when it was sunk within shore battery range of Point Tagan, Matsuwa Island, in Kurlies.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Commanded by LCDR D. Zabriski, Jr., Herring was on her eighth war patrol.  Conducting a surface attack near land, she sank both a freighter and passenger-cargoman.  During the action, however, a shore battery spotted her and opened fire, making two direct hits on her conning tower and causing her loss.  Herring was the only US submarine sunk by a land battery during World War II.

  
USS Golet (SS-361) was lost on 14-Jun-1944 with the loss of 82 crew when it was sunk in a surface attack near 41° 04N - 14° 13E
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  R states NW of Honshu

On her second war patrol under the command of LCDR J.S. Clark.  Golet was apparently lost in a battle with antisubmarine forces north of Honshu, Japan.

  
USS Bonefish (SS-223) was lost on 18-Jun-1945 with the loss of 85 crew when it was sunk in Toyama Wan; Near Suzu Misaki; 37° 18N - 137° 25E; in the Sea of Japan.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Winner of 2 Navy Unit Commendations, Bonefish was on her eighth war patrol and commanded by CDR L.L. Edge.   After sinking a passenger-cargoman, Bonefish was subjected to a savage depth-charge attack, which brought oil and wood to the surface as evidence of her demise.  She was the last SubPac submarine lost in World War II.

JULY

  
USS Grunion (SS-216) was lost on 30-July-1942 with the loss of 70 crew when it was sunk near entrance to Kiska (Alaska) Harbor
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM
Remarks:  Possibly diveable water.  WDR states 7-30-42 to 8-6-42

Grunion was on her first war patrol under the command of LCDR M.L. Abele.  Kiska had been occupied by Japanese forces for about six weeks at that time.  Grunion sank two 300 ton sub-chasers and badly damaged a third, and made her last transmission on July 30.  She was then ordered to return to Dutch Harbor, but was never heard from again.  Her loss remains a mystery, since post-war examination of Japanese records noted neither any anti-submarine attacks in the vicinity around that date, nor any minefields having been planted nearby.

  
USS Runner (SS-275) was declared lost 1-Jul-1943 with the loss of 78 crew when it was sunk somewhere between Midway Island and Hokkaido, Japan.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Location not known.  Cause not known.  Date of loss not known.  Declared lost date used.   WDR gives date spread as 5-28 to 7-4-43

Commanded by LCDR J.H. Bourland, Runner was on her third war patrol.  She was making her way toward a patrol area near Hokkaido.  Enroute, she sank one freighter and one passenger-cargoman off the Kuriles.  As there was no reported antisubmarine attack in the area on the relevant dates, Runner is believed to have been lost to mines.

  
USS S-28 (SS-133) was lost on 4-Jul-1944 with the loss of 49 crew when it foundered off Hawaii, while operating with USCGC Reliance.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Commanded by LCDR J.G. Campbell, she was conducting training exercises off Hawaii together with the US Coast Guard Cutter Reliance.  After S-28 dove for a practice torpedo approach, Reliance lost sound contact at a range of 4700 yards.  No distress signal or explosion was heard.  When contact could not be resumed, Reliance summoned help to conduct a search.  Two days later, a diesel oil stain was found on the surface near where S-28 had last dived in 1400 fathoms of water.  The exact cause of her loss remains a mystery.

  
USS Robalo (SS-273) was lost on 26-Jul-1944 with the loss of 77 crew when it was sunk 2 miles off west coast of Palawan.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Possibly diveable water.

On her third war patrol under the command of CDR M.M. Kimmel, Robalo struck a mine about two miles off the coast of Palawan.   Four men survived the sinking and swam ashore.  This is known because they were caught and imprisoned by the Japanese, but managed to get a note smuggled out via local guerrillas.  Unfortunately, they were removed by a Japanese destroyer on August 15 and subsequently lost when that destroyer was sunk.

AUGUST

  
USS S-39 (SS-144) was lost on 13-Aug-1942 when it was destroyed after grounding on reef south of Rossel Island Louisande Archipelago.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Hulk reported sighted in 1978

Commanded by LT F.E. Brown, S-39 was on her third war patrol.  The entire crew was able to get off and onto a reef, and was subsequently rescued by HMAS Katoomba.

  
USS Flier (SS-250) was lost on 13-Aug-1944 with the loss of 78 crew when it was sunk in Balabac Strait near Mantangule Island.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  One secondary source stated 8 men survived and were taken prisoner.  Ros and SFLM state correctly that eight men survived and were rescued by USS Redfin on 30 August 1944.

On her second war patrol and commanded by CDR J.D. Crowley, Flier was transiting the Balabac Strait on the surface when she was rocked by a massive explosion (probably a mine) and sank within less than a minute.  13 survivors, some injured, made it into the water and started swimming to Mantangule Island.  8 survivors made it, and six days later encountered friendly natives who guided them to a U.S. Army Coast Watcher unit on Palawan.  These survivors were evacuated by the USS Redfin on August 31.

  
USS Harder (SS-257) was lost on 24-Aug-1944 with the loss of 79 crew when it was sunk off Caiman Point, Luzon, RPI
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Possibly diveable water.

Commanded by CDR S.D. Dealey, Harder had won a Presidential Unit Citation for her first five war patrols.  Cdr. Dealey was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor posthumously, and Harder is tied for ninth in the number of enemy ships sunk.   At the time of her loss to a depth-charge attack by a minesweeper off Caiman Point near Bataan, Harder was on her sixth war patrol.

  
USS Bullhead (SS-332) was lost on 6-Aug-1945 with the loss of 84 crew when it was sunk in West end of Lombok Strait.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Commanded by LCDR E.R. Holt, Jr., Bullhead was on her third war patrol.  Post-war examination of Japanese records revealed that she fell victim to a depth charge attack by a Japanese Army plane.

  
USS Cochino (SS-345) was lost on 26-Aug-1949 with one man lost when it was sunk in Norwegian Sea.
Sources:  R, D, SFLM
Remarks:  She sank after a battery explosion and fire forced her to be abandoned.  The nearby USS Tusk came to her rescue; however, one man from Cochino and six from the Tusk were lost during rescue operations.

SEPTEMBER

  
USS S-5 (SS-110) was lost on 1-Sep-1920 when it foundered off Deleware Capes 40 miles offshore.
Sources:  R, D, SFLM
Remarks:  All the crew escaped through a hole cut in hull in the tiller room.  Hull towed by US Battleship Ohio until it foundered about 5 miles from sinking point.  Metal from hole is in Navy Memorial Museum.

  
USS S-51 (SS-162) was lost on 25-Sep-1925 with the loss of 33 crew when it was sunk after collision with SS City of Rome off Block Island.
Sources:  R, D, SFLM
Remarks:  Hull raised, studied and scrapped.

  
USS Grayling (SS-209) was lost on 9-Sep-1943 with the loss of 76 crew when it was sunk in or near Tablas Strait, PI.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  WDR gives date spread as 9-9 to 9-12-43

Grayling was on her eighth war patrol and commanded by LCDR R.M. Brinker.  On this patrol, Grayling sank a tanker and a 5480 ton passenger-cargoman, and damaged a freighter.  The exact cause of her loss remains a mystery.

  
USS Pompano (SS-181) was lost, possibly on Sept 17, 1943 with the loss of 77 crew when it was sunk off the northeast coast of Honshu
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  WDR gives date spread as 8-20 to 9-27-43

Commanded by LCDR W.M. Thomas, Pompano was on her seventh war patrol.  On this patrol, she is credited with sinking two enemy cargo ships.  The exact cause of her loss remains unknown.

Pompano was sunk (between Sept 17 and Oct 5).  Possibly lost on Sept 17, 1943.  Japanese records show that a submarine was sunk in her patrol area on 17 September by air & depth charge attack off the Aomori Prefecture near Shiriya Zaki.  Before being lost, she sank two enemy cargo ships. The exact cause of her loss remains unknown, but she probably was sunk by the air/sea attack above or fell victim to a mine on or after 9/25/1943.
This boat's last recorded ship (Taiko Maru) sunk happened on Sept 25th, so she probably hit a mine on or after that date but before Oct 5th, when she was scheduled back at Midway.

  
USS Cisco (SS-290) was lost on 28-Sep-1943 with the loss of 76 crew when it was sunk in Sulu Sea west of Mindinao, 9° 47N; 12° 144E
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Cisco was on her first war patrol under the command of LCDR J.W. Coe, former captain of both S-39 and Skipjack.   Based on Japanese reports, Cisco appears to have unknowingly had a leaking fuel tank that created an oil slick "trail".   On a calm sea, this "trail" enabled a combined air and surface antisubmarine force to locate and sink her.

OCTOBER

  
USS O-5 (SS-66) was lost on 29-Oct-1923 with the loss of 3 crew when it was sunk after collision with SS ABANGAREZ (United Fruit) off Panama Canal.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM
Remarks:  Hull raised and scrapped.

Torpedoman’s Mate 2d Class (SS) Henry Berault received the Congressional Medal of Honor for his heroic actions.

  
USS S-44 (SS-155) was lost on 7-Oct-1943 with the loss of 56 crew when it was sunk off Paramushiru, Kuriles (Northern); One day out of Attu.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  S-44 was on her fifth war patrol and commanded by LCDR F.E. Brown.  Attacking a target thought to be a merchant on the surface, S-44 found herself in a losing gun battle with a heavily armed Japanese destroyer.  Two men were taken prisoner and survived the war.

  
USS Wahoo (SS-238) was lost on 11-Oct-1943 with the loss of 80 crew when it was sunk in or near La Perouse Strait off northen Japan.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  The Wahoo has been found and verified by the US Navy.

Under the command of one of the great sub skippers of World War II, LCDR D.W. "Mush" Morton, Wahoo was on her seventh war patrol.  Wahoo had won a Presidential Unit Citation, and ranks fifth in the number of enemy ships sunk. She was lost to depth charges dropped by a Japanese patrol aircraft.

  
USS Dorado (SS-248) was lost on 12-Oct-1943 with the loss of 77 crew when it was sunk in the sOUTH Western Atlantic.   Possibly near Cuba
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Ship not found and demise is speculated as either being caused by an unknown U-boat, a patrolling B-24 or by an Allied air attack.

Newly commissioned and under the command of LCDR E.C. Schneider, Dorado had departed New London on October 6 and was enroute to Panama.  There is a degree of uncertainty as to how she met her end.  She may have been sunk by a U.S. patrol plane that had received faulty instructions regarding bombing restriction areas.  It is also possible that she was lost to a German U-boat that was in the vicinity.

  
USS Seawolf (SS-197) was lost on 3-Oct-1944 with the loss of 83 crew and 17 US Army troops when it was sunk just north of Morotai, between PI and Indonesia; 02° 32 N; 129° 18E.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Sunk by own forces in submarine safety zone.

In this tragic error, Rowell mistook Seawolf for a Japanese submarine in the area that had just sunk another U.S. DE protecting a Seventh Fleet Task Force.  Seawolf ranks seventh in the number of enemy ships sunk, and had won two Navy Unit Commendations.  At the time of her loss, she was commanded by LCDR A.C. Bontier and on her fifteenth war patrol.

  
USS Escolar (SS-294) was lost on or after 17-Oct-1944 with the loss of 82 crew when it was sunk somewhere east of 33° 44N; 127° 33E; in the Yellow Sea of China.  While heading for 33° 44N; 124° 06E.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Declared lost sometime after 13 November 1944, later revised.  WDR gives date spread as 10-17-44 to 11-3-44

She was on her first war patrol under the command of CDR W.J. Millican, and was most likely lost to a mine somewhere in the Yellow Sea.

  
USS Shark (SS-314) was lost on 24-Oct-1944 with the loss of 87 crew when it was sunk in the channel midway between Hainan and Bashi; 20° 41N; 118° 27E.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  R states sinking off Southern Formosa.

The second boat to carry this name during World War II, she was on her third war patrol, commanded by CDR E.N. Blakely.   Shark was sunk by escorts after attacking and sinking a lone freighter.  Compounding the tragedy, it turned out that the freighter had 1800 U.S. POWs on board.

  
USS Darter (SS-227) was lost on 24-Oct-1944 when it became grounded on Bombay Shoal off Palawan then was destroyed.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Portions of hull remained as of 1998

The entire crew was rescued by USS Dace.  Winner of one Navy Unit Commendation, Darter was commanded by CDR D.H. McClintock.  Just having sunk one heavy cruiser and damaged another, Darter went aground while attempting an "end around" on an enemy formation in hopes of getting in an attack on a battleship.

  
USS Tang (SS-306) was lost on 25-Oct-1944 with the loss of 78 crew when it was sunk in north end of Formosa Strait in vicinity of Turnabout Island.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  In diveable water in PRC territory

Tang was on her fifth war patrol under command of CDR R.H. O'Kane.  Tang ranks second in the number of enemy ships sunk and fourth in tonnage, and had won two Presidential Unit Citations.  During a daring night surface attack, Tang was lost to a circular run by one of her own torpedoes.  Nine of the crew were taken prisoner, including CDR O'Kane and five (nine?) who had gained the surface from Tang's final resting place 180 feet below.  All survived the war, and CDR O'Kane was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.
Explanation: Nine survivors were picked up by the Japanese and were repatriated after the war – O’Kane, Caverly, and Leibold, who were swept off the bridge, Savadkin, who escaped from the flooded conning tower, and DaSilva, Decker, Flanagan, Narowanski, and Trukke, who made the ascent from the sunken vessel.

NOVEMBER

  
USS Corvina (SS-226) was lost on 16-Nov-1943 with the loss of 82 crew when it was sunk just south of Truk; (Attack at 151° 10E; 5° 50N)
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Sunk by IJN submarine.  Deep water

Under the command of CDR R.S. Rooney, Corvina was on her first war patrol.  It appears that she was lost to the torpedoes of a Japanese submarine.

  
USS Sculpin (SS-191) was lost on 19-Nov-1943 with the loss of 40 crew when it was sunk north of Groluk Island near Truk.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Scuttled by crew, after severe damage by enemy forces.

Severely damaged by depth charges after attacking an enemy convoy north of Oroluk Island near Truk, Sculpin continued to fight on the surface.  There, however, she was no match for the enemy destroyers.  When the captain (CDR F. Connaway) was killed, the decision was made to abandon ship and scuttle Sculpin.  42 officers and men were taken prisoner; only 21 survived the war.  Among those not abandoning ship was CAPT J.P. Cromwell, aboard as a potential wolfpack commander.  CAPT Cromwell rode the Sculpin down, fearing that vital information in his possession might be compromised under torture.  For this, CAPT Cromwell was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.
Explanation: For clarity’s sake, 63 lost (12 killed in action prior to sinking, 30 killed in the sinking, one man killed in captivity (not officially a POW), 20 POWs later died), and 21 POWs survived. In other words, of the 84 men aboard Sculpin for her final patrol, 21 survived the war.

  
USS Albacore (SS-218) was lost on 7-Nov-1944 with the loss of 85 crew when it was sunk near 41° 49N; 141° 11E in channel between Hokkaido and Honshu.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  No reports of finding wreckage.  Diveable water.

Winner of two Presidential Unit Citations, Albacore was on her eleventh war patrol under the command of LCDR H.R. Rimmer.   She struck a mine while running submerged near a Japanese patrol craft that had detected her.  That patrol craft witnessed the explosion and debris that resulted from the loss of Albacore.

  
USS Growler (SS-215) was lost on 8-Nov-1944 with the loss of 86 crew when it was sunk in South China Sea.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Winner of two Navy Unit Commendations, Growler was on her twelfth war patrol, commanded by CDR T.B. Oakley, Jr.   Growler was lost while attacking a convoy;  whether she succumbed to a depth charge attack or was a victim of a circular run by one of her own torpedoes has never been determined.

  
USS Scamp (SS-277) was lost on 16-Nov-1944 with the loss of 83 crew when it was sunk off Inubo Saki near Tokyo Bay.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  R states South of Tokyo Bay.  WDR gives date spread as 11-9-44 to 11-16-44

She was commanded by CDR J.C. Hollingsworth and on her eighth war patrol.  She may have been damaged by a mine prior to her loss, since she was trailing oil.  This leak helped Japanese coast defense vessels locate her and destroy her with depth charges.

DECEMBER

  
USS F-1 [ex-CARP] (SS-20) was lost on 17-Dec-1917 with the loss of 19 crew when it was sunk after collision with USS F-3 off San Clemente.
Sources:  R, D, SFLM
Remarks:  Dived and photographed by DSRV in 1997

  
USS S-4 (SS-109) was lost on 17-Dec-1927 with the loss of 40 crew when it was sunk after ramming by USCG Paulding off Provencetown Massachusetts.
Sources:  R, D, SFLM
Remarks:  All but 4 men died within hours in engineroom and motor room due to asphyxiation.  Four men trapped in torpedo room survived for possibly 60 hours.  Hull raised and used for study in submarine escape.  Scuttled off Hawaii

  
USS Sealion (SS-195) was lost on 10-Dec-1941 with the loss of 4 crew (Note: One Sealion man later died as a POW) when it was scuttled in Manila Bay after damage at Cavite Navy Yard
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  Bombed on 10 December 1941.  Damage was sufficient to preclude removal to home waters when Phillipines were surrendered.  Scuttling took place on 25 December.  Portions of wreckage remained in place until late 1950's when it was sold for scrapping.

  
USS Capelin (SS-289) was lost on or after 3-Dec-1943 with the loss of 76 crew when it was sunk off Celebes possibly off Kaoe Bay; Halmahera 1° 34N; 123° 07E or in Molukka Passage.
Sources:  R, D, Ros, SFLM, WDR
Remarks:  R states after 2 December 43.  Ros states an attack was made by IJN on 23 Nov and also a reported sighting by Bonefish of a US sub on 2 December.  No reports from boat made after leaving Darwin around 17 Novemeber 1943.   No declared lost date found.  WDR date spread is 11-23 to 12-9-43

She was on her first war patrol, commanded by CDR E.E. Marshall, who had previously commanded Cuttlefish.  Both her exact location and cause of loss remain a mystery.  She may have been lost in the Celebes Sea, Molucca Passage or Molucca Sea, either to mines or an operational casualty.

Sources
R Roberts, Stephen, et al, Registry of US Warships
D Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships
Ros Roscoe, Theodore, Submarine Operations of WWII
SFLM Submarine Force Library and Museum Boat Books
WDR War Damage Report
Remarks Expanded remarks provided by Frank Morgan - Dallas Base member